a poem by raymond funk

Pathways

Does the seed rejoice
when it loses sight of light?
When it is buried
slowly
underneath the earth?
Comfort
in its dark embrace?

Does it understand?
Holy mystery;
potential release;
hull shudder,
creaking,
cracking in the unseen?

Does it feel life’s pull?
Push towards the warmth,
the calling of sun?
Burrow deeper in,
deeper
down
into the richness, the intimate earth?

Pathways through sky and stone,
we push ever further,
into unknown, with unseen force
into the depths and into the heights,
light displays our growth
as darkness conceals its source.

by Raymond Funk

desertland prayer

[a poem from the prayer book by our own Rachael Barham that seems fitting for Lent]:

Desertland Prayer

God of the heavens,
I lay myself before you
In this desertland
Like carrion for the crows,
Naked and exposed.
Long I have wandered
Without water
In paths I have not known
And now I come parched,
Still confused,
Daring to believe in water.

By Rachael Barham,

(Monday 15th November, 2004)

on hope through hard times

Hope… is an orientation of the spirit, an orientation of the heart; it transcends the world that is immediately experienced and is anchored somewhere beyond its horizons.

Hope in this deep and powerful sense, is not the same as joy that things are going well, or willingness to invest in enterprises that are obviously headed for early success, but, rather, an ability to work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed.… It is not the conviction that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something makes sense, regardless of how it turns out. In short, I think that the deepest and most important form of hope, the only one that can keep us above water and urge us to good works, and the only source of the breathtaking dimension of the human spirit and its efforts, is something we get, as it were, from “elsewhere.” It is also this hope, above all, which gives us the strength to live and continually to try new things, even in conditions that seem as hopeless as our do, here and now.

– Vaclav Havel, (Czech playwright and dissident, originally published in Czech in 1986, this excerpt from Disturbing the Peace is included in the chapter “An Orientation of the Heart” from The Impossible Will Take a Little While.)

an early quote suggesting you can’t take it with you…

“Do not lose by saving, but gather in by scattering. Give to the poor, and you
give to yourself. You will not be allowed to keep what you have refused to give
others.”

– St. Peter Chrysologus (406-450)

On the nature of truth in the midst of dialogue between Christians

[This is an excerpt from Patriarch Athenagoras I who led the Orthodox church in its steps toward dialogue with the Roman Catholic church in 1964:]

I am trying to change the spiritual atmosphere. The restoration of mutual love will enable us to see the questions in a totally different light. We must express the truth which is dear to us – because it protects and celebrates the immensity of the life which is in Christ – we must express it, not so as to repulse the other, so as to force him to admit that he is beaten, but so as to share it with him; and also for its own sake, for its beauty, as a celebration of truth to which we invite our brothers. At the same time we must be ready to listen. For Christians, truth is not opposed to life or love; it expresses their fullness. First of all, we must free these words, these words which tend to collide, from the evil past, from all political, national and cultural hatreds which have nothing to do with Christ. Then we must root them in the deep life of the Church, in the experience of the Resurrection which it is their mission to serve. We must always weigh our words in the balance of life and death and Resurrection.

Those who accuse me of sacrificing Orthodoxy to a blind obsession with love, have a very poor conception of the truth. They make it into a system which they possess, which reassures them, when what it really is, is the living glorification of the living God, with all the risks involved in creative life. And we don’t possess God; it is He who holds us and fills us with His presence in proportion to our humility and love. Only by love can we glorify the God of love, only by giving and sharing and sacrificing oneself can one glorify the God who, to save us, sacrificed himself and went to death, the death of the cross.

But I would go further. Those who reproach me with sacrificing truth to love have no confidence in the truth. They shut it up, they lock it up like an unfaithful woman. But I say, if the truth is the truth, we must not be afraid for it; let us give it, let us share it, let us show it in its fullness, let us welcome all that there is of light and love in the experience of our brethren. If we continue in this attitude, then truth will become clear of itself, it will conquer all limitations and inadequacies from within, on the basis of the common mystery of the Church. Let us enlarge our hearts, “let each one of us, as the apostle says, look not to our own things, but rather to the things of others” (Phil. 2:4). We have a sure criterion – life in Christ. Faced with a partial expression of the truth, let us ask in what measure it conveys the life in Christ, or in what measure it is liable to compromise it.

– Athenagoras, Patriarch of Constantinople

(You can read more here.)