Every real thing is a joy…

[Eating together is a central part of community life at SSU. Here are some thoughts from a master at combining theology and cooking:]

There is a habit that plagues many so-called spiritual minds: they imagine that matter and spirit are somehow at odds with each other and that the right course for human life is to escape from the world of matter into some finer and purer (and undoubtedly duller) realm. To me, that is a crashing mistake – and it is, above all, a theological mistake. Because, in fact, it was God who invented dirt, onions and turnip greens; God who invented human beings, with their strange compulsion to cook their food; God, who, at the end of each day of creation, pronounced a resounding “Good!” over his own concoctions….

Food and cooking, therefore, are not low subjects. In fact there are no low subjects anywhere in the physical universe. Every real thing is a joy, if only you have eyes and ears to relish it, a nose and a tongue to taste it. But more than that, food and cooking are among the richest subjects in the world. Every day of our lives, they preoccupy, delight and refresh us. Food is not just some fuel we need to get us going toward higher things. Cooking is not a drudgery we put up with in order to get the fuel delivered. Rather, each is a heart’s astonishment. Both stop us dead in our tracks with wonder. Even more, they sit us down evening after evening, and in the company that forms around our dinner tables, they actually create our humanity.          – Robert Farrar Capon, The Supper of the Lamb

More on the everyday

Richard Rollheiser shares this insight about the everyday nature of prayer:

“Eating has a natural rhythm: banquets and quick snacks, rich meals and
simple sandwiches, high times with linen serviettes and low times with paper
napkins, meals which take a whole evening and meals which you eat on the
run. And the two depend upon each other: You can only have high season if
you mostly have ordinary time; prayer is the same.”